COVID-19 Fast Facts

  1. What is COVID-19?
  2. What Precautions should I take?
  3. What's the deal about facemask & gloves?
  4. Isolation, Quarantine,  or Self-monitoring?
  5. I've tested positive, now what?
  6. NC LINKS Youth COVID Resources
  7. Check My Symptoms Online

What are coronaviruses? What is COVID-19?

CDC Link to COVID-19 Information

Coronaviruses are a large group of viruses that can cause illness in animals and humans. Some coronaviruses commonly circulate in the United States, and usually cause upper respiratory symptoms such as cough or runny nose, although some can cause more serious illness. The 2019 novel (new) coronavirus causes the illness COVID-19. First identified in Wuhan, China, and is now being spread throughout the world.  People are encouraged to take common-sense precautions to prevent the spread of all infectious diseases. 

How does COVID-19 spread?

CDC Link to Preventing COVID-19 Spread in Communities

Coronaviruses, like COVID-19, are most often spread through the air by coughing or sneezing, through close personal contact (including touching and shaking hands) or through touching your nose, mouth or eyes before washing your hands.  

Help up prevent the spread of such a virus:

  • Keeping your child home if they have had a fever, used fever-reducing medication, or experienced symptoms of illness within the past 24 hours
  • Stay home when you are sick with a fever, using fever-reducing medication, or experiencing symptoms of illness within the last 24 hours
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Wear a cloth face covering when out in public

What are the Symptoms?

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness.

Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

This list is not all possible symptoms. Other less common symptoms have been reported, including gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

ER COVID


Two kinds of tests for COVID-19: viral tests and antibody tests.

  • A viral test tells you if you have a current infection.
  • An antibody test might tell you if you had a past infection. An antibody test might not show if you have a current infection because it can take 1–3 weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies. Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies might provide or how long this protection might last.

If you test positive or negative for COVID-19 on a viral or an antibody test, you still should take preventive measures to protect yourself and others.


Results

If you test positive for COVID-19 by a viral test, know what protective steps to take if you are sick or caring for someone.

­­If you test negative for COVID-19 by a viral test, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. However, that does not mean you will not get sick. The test result only means that you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing. You might test negative if the sample was collected early in your infection and test positive later during your illness. You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and get infected then.

How to get tested for current COVID-19 infection? 

Direct exposure should consider themselves positive and quarantine for 14 days

They do not want to test as soon as they find out they have had direct contact with a positive covid. If they are not showing symptoms they need to wait closer to the end of the quarantine time to test

Health Department can do referrals for the people that do not have a primary doctor, if they have a primary doctor they need to call the doctor for referral.


Direct exposure is they have had direct contact with the person that is positive not the persons, girlfriend or family member but the person that is positive.

Indirect contact does not need to test.


Must have referral to test.

Need to wait on nurse to call back before they go to testing site because the referral can take several hours to go through system.

  • To learn if you have a current infection, viral tests are used. Most people have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. Contact your healthcare provider if your symptoms are getting worse or if you have questions about your health.
  • Decisions about testing are made by state and localexternal icon health departments or healthcare providers. You can visit your state or localexternal icon health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.
  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first.
  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and are not tested, it is important to stay home. Learn what to do if you are sick.